Protecting Humans

A robotic arm writes repeated promises not to hurt humans in artist Filipe Vilas-Boas and architect Paul Coudamy's installation The Punishment.

standardisation project

Projet|"Standardisation" est une story faite de mots et de phrases courtes, remplaçant la vidéo et décrivant des situations récurrentes sur Instagram. Elle dénonce la standardisation des comportements sociaux et des tendances,
ainsi que l'uniformisation de nos lieux de vie et cela jusque dans nos assiettes. 

Project|Standardisation is a story made by words and short sentences replacing video describing recurrent situations on Instagram. It reveals the standardisation of social behaviors and trends, from the uniformisation of our lifestyle to our plates. 


It reveals the standardisation of social behaviors and trends,
from the uniformisation of our lifestyle to our plates. 



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Innovative electric wallpaper connects speakers, lights and fans !

Design| Innovative collaboration from Wallpaper company Flavorpaper and furniture brand UM Project. Conduct brings wall coverings to an entirely new level by throwing in an interactive experience that merges design with electricity !

  It combine sounds, lights and motions in a decorative and playful display titled Connect, which they showcased at this year's Collective Design fair in New York.

THE INFINITE NOW

cinemagraph | Created by dutch cinematographer Armand Dijcks and australian photographer Ray Collins, ‘The infinite now’ is a poetic short film composed of breathtaking cinemagraphs of ocean waves, heaving and crashing in perpetual motion. Each cinemagraph is created using one of collins’ own still photographs, setting the image in an infinite loop of sea. 

You can see the original cinemagraphs here

Source : Designboom

An Illustrated Talk With Maurice Sendak by Christoph Niemann

admiration Last November in New York, I went to Christoph Niemann's talk at The New School and I discovered this little animation he created using a portion of an NPR Fresh Air talk with the celebrated children’s author and illustrator Maurice Sendak as inspiration. Terri Gross interviewed the author and illustrator on her NPR show Fresh Air. Christoph Niemann was listening, and he has created a beautiful illustrated video that is scored by the last five minutes of that conversation.
Attention please..it will you bring your tears.

magnetic wall and modular design elements for a totally custom look

innovation |  Visual Magnetics is a materials innovation company focused on transformative, magnetic surface design for walls. Visual Magnetics’ unique magnetic wide-format materials can be used in a multitude of applications, each custom designed, printed, and easily adaptable.
source : http://www.visualmagnetics.com/

Dusen Dusen has created a line of bold and playful magnetic wallcoverings for Visual Magnetics. The ability to change and rearrange the shapes, allows users to continuously reinterpret Dusen Dusen’s designs. 

Dusen Dusen has created a line of bold and playful magnetic wallcoverings for Visual Magnetics. The ability to change and rearrange the shapes, allows users to continuously reinterpret Dusen Dusen’s designs. 

As part of their ongoing collaboration with Ellen Van Dusen of DUSEN DUSEN, the designer's latest site-specific installation using Visual Magnetics's magnetic textiles is now on display at the Children's Museum of the Arts. Van Dusen's large-scale installation is located in the museum's Pepperman Family Art Studio, and created using her instantly-recognizable aesthetic of vibrant colors and abstract shapes.

The installation for the CMA was designed like a coloring book - the background is black with outlines of objects, characters and patterns, which have become characters in their own right. The magnetic second layer is versions of those characters that are colored in. Guests can match the colored object with its corresponding outline, or create their own vignettes using the characters.

A Set of Nameless Paints Wants to Change the Way Kids Learn About Color

innovation | Design duo Ima Moteki wants to change the way kids learn about color. They’ve created a set of “Nameless Paints” whose colors are simply identified by just that – their color. In addition to rejecting labels, the paints also teach color theory. 

The original presentation for “Nameless Paints”

The original presentation for “Nameless Paints”

It’s a radical new way of getting kids to intuitively understand color and remove the preconceptions that names like “green” and “blue” create.

“By not assigning names to the colors we want to expand the definition of what a color can be, and the various shades they can create by mixing them,” explains Yusuke Imai. 
Instead of names, each tube in the 10-color paint set is identified by one or more circles of color. For tubes with more than one circle, the size of the circle indicates the proportion of paint that were mixed to create the resulting color. 
Nameless Paints are a fun way to explore how color works !

Source: spoontamago

Future is offscreen

trends | JOTO just restored my faith in humanity.
Joto is not another screen, quite the opposite, it turns pictures and words from your screen into pen and ink drawings.
It seems some things in life are just better off screen! 
Joto is on Kickstarter if you want to help this amazing project !